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Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Integration Services by Kirk Haselden I've read a couple of the best SSIS books on the market and I can say that I think this one is tops...


I guess I'll start with a disclaimer: I work for Microsoft, as does Kirk. Although this is overall a positive review, I'll tell you why I like the book, and also a few things to watch out for.

I think the best thing about this book is that it's comprehensive and lucid. Rest assured, if you study this book and actually work through the tutorial sections, you will learn SSIS quickly. Kirk is the Program Manager for SSIS, so he has plenty of credibility as he explains every area of the product. In fact, in a few places he goes so far as to point out certain shortcomings in SSIS, and even divulge internal Microsoft plans to likely address certain issues in service packs or future releases.

A nice thing about this book is how it dives into each of the types of the following: Scopes (he describes seven!), Workflow Tasks (16), Connection Managers (16), Log Providers (5), Foreach Enumerators (7), Source Adapters (6), Destination Adapters (3), and of course, Transforms (18). He tells you when and how to use each of these tools to build good SSIS packages.

For those of you who are .NET developers, you can also extend SSIS. Kirk shows you how in the last two chapters that cover building custom tasks and custom data flow components. You won't want to tackle either of those topics without reading what he has to say.

I've read a couple of the best SSIS books on the market and I can say that I think this one is tops. Having a single author means it may take longer to produce a book than one written by a team of authors, but it helps the consistency and readability when it finally gets published. In particular, Kirk has a good writing style and the book is well-organized.

So what's not to like? One drawback for newbies is that he sometimes gets a bit deep into non-introductory topics, e.g. custom logging. But you can skip that section if you don't need it right away. Also, you may want to read the section on The Task and TaskHost Container twice to let it all sink in.

Book Reviewer: Scott Zimmerman

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SQL Server 2005 Express in 24 hours The book is well organized. The depth and breadth in the book is appropriate for beginning DBAs, developers, and students...


The book is well organized. The depth and breadth in the book is appropriate for beginning DBAs, developers, and students. It covers installation, basic database concepts, T-SQL, management, security, and ADO.NET programming using VB.NET and C#. It is amazing that the author managed to cover so much material in a relatively thin book without skipping important topics. This is a very good introductory book. I will give the book 4 stars.

One common problem of the step-by-step books is that you will get lost and do not know how to get to the next step. You are asked to click an icon but the book does not show you the shape of the icon, neither an arrow pointing the icon. What you can do is hover the mouse pointer around the icons slowly and look for pop-up messages to locate it. Most of the time, you should be able to figure out the minor missing links.

When you are stuck, you can look up 'SQL Server Books Online.' You can also find more advanced topics and techniques there.

The version of SQL server 2005 Express in the CD that comes with the book is old. You should download and install the following from Microsoft 1. Current version of SQL server 2005 Express SP2. 2. SQL Server 2005 Books Online. 3. NorthWind sample database(instructions can be found in Appendix A)

To download the source code, 1. Go to www.samspublishing.com. 2. Look for 'Book Support & Downloads' under 'Quick Links.' 3. Enter the ISBN to find the book. 4. Click 'Source Code' link beneath 'More Information' portion.

Book Reviewer: Jenn-Rong Chen

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Delivering Business Intelligence with Microsoft SQL Server 2005 by Brian Larson A must-have for all dealing with SQL Server 2005 Business Intelligence...


With this book, Mr. Larson executes a task not easy to do-he covers a lot of ground in a few steps. He covers all major topics of BI related to SQL Server 2005 and has sample exercises (Learn By Doing) that reinforce the knowledge. What is great about the exercises is that he uses a fictional company in one real scenario, unlike many authors.

As someone not very familiar with Data Mining/Warehousing, I found his explanations to be at my level of understanding. He also ties each aspect he discusses in with the other subjects as you go along, making the whole concept of Business Intelligence clear. I look forward to reading more of Mr. Larson's publications.

Book Reviewer: Tim Cullen

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Microsoft SQL Server 2005: A Beginner’s Guide by Dusan Petkovic If I may summarize the book by renaming the title of the book, that would be like this. "A Beginner’s Guide: Learning Relational Database by using Microsoft SQL 2005"


Like I implicated from above, this book is NOT about teaching you all the features from SQL 2005 and how to use in detail. This book is most likely not for either Mid-Senior DBA specific or any BI specific. If you want to know about all those, you are not picking up the right book. However, if you are new to Relational Database and want to learn about it and you happen to have SQL Server 2005 since you are familiar with windows environment and don’t want to go other RDBMS such as Oracle, DB2, MySQL, etc, this most likely is the book for you to start since SQL 2005 is out there already, why you want to go for older version like SQL 2000. I found this book is much closer to text book for school then reference book. It even has “Exercises” section end of each chapter. Since it is more likely text-book, this is pretty decent book for teaching entry level DBA/Developer for the training since it also covers the basics about RDBMS not just SQL 2005. This book also briefly mentioned about, but not too short, almost all area of SQL 2005 features so that the reader can get a feel what are the features that SQL 2005 can do or cannot do (this may be harder to find since SQL 2005 has so many features that you can even think what can you do with this)

Overall, I satisfied with this book not as a Senior DBA but as a person who is looking for a text-book for teaching RDBMS to my junior/mid level DBA.

Book Reviewer: Kun Lee

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Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2005 by Andrew J. Brust, Stephen Forte This book gives a good overview of each topic that it covers, and the authors are obviously knowledgable about the topics they cover.


This book provides a general overview of SQL Server 2005 and programming in SQL Server 2005 topics. Although the title belies the user into thinking that the content is only programming, this book contains general SQL Server information, such as security and OLAP concepts. Split into three parts, the book covers the fundamentals of using T-SQL, how to use SQL Server in applications, and business intelligence.

Part I includes information about T-SQL, CLR, XML, SMO, and security. The T-SQL and XML sections expect familiarity with SQL Server 2000 functionality, and the SMO section expect knowledge of basic programming skills in Visual Studio. On the other hand, the XML section explains in great details general XML knowledge before explaining the features that SQL Server 2005 provides.

Part II addresses SQL Server 2005 in applications, including ADO.NET 2.0, Web Services, transactions, and SQL Server Everywhere and Express editions. Most code samples are in C# and expect some knowledge of Visual Studio. The authors again explain transactions at a general level before delving into handling transactions in both T-SQL and CLR.

Part III discusses the new business intelligence features in SQL Server 2005. These features include SSIS, SSAS, data mining, and SSRS. Each topic contains a nice overview with more detailed information about customizing and extending the code base.

This book gives a good overview of each topic that it covers, and the authors are obviously knowledgable about the topics they cover. I would recommend that anyone who wants to delve deeper into any of these topics buy a book that is written solely on that topic. Overall, the authors achieved their stated goal of "Our approach has been to add value to the product's documentation by providing a developer-oriented investigation of the new and improved features and services in SQL Server 2005."

Overall, I satisfied with this book not as a Senior DBA but as a person who is looking for a text-book for teaching RDBMS to my junior/mid level DBA.

Book Reviewer: Jessica Moss

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Microsoft SQL Server 2005: Applied Techniques Step by Step by Solid Quality Learning If you are looking for a broad overview of SQL Server 2005, "Microsoft SQL Server 2005: Applied Techniques Step by Step" by Solid Quality Learning is a good option.


If you are looking for a broad overview of SQL Server 2005, "Microsoft SQL Server 2005: Applied Techniques Step by Step" by Solid Quality Learning is a good option. This book is well organized and covers the basics of SQL Server 2005. It is a wonderful resource for new SQL Server Database Administrators or for a Database Administrator that is new to SQL Server 2005. There are thoughtfully organized lists of things to consider for tasks such as backups, monitoring and performance tuning. The book also comes with a nice set of examples that can be used to explore the options available in SQL Server 2005, such as schemas and database mirroring.

In conclusion, "Microsoft SQL Server 2005: Applied Techniques Step by Step" by Solid Quality Learning is a well organized reference book with nice examples to demonstrate the features of SQL Server 2005. If you are new to SQL Server 2005, this is a good starting point.

Book Reviewer: Erik Quist

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